Clothing

Clothing

 The club has spare sailing kit for new members.

Winter Clothing

It is important to wear the correct clothing during winter. The club dinghy sailor must be self-sufficient within cold water, in the situation where the rescue facilities are temporary dealing with higher priorities. All clothing can be obtained by mail-order or from the local chandlers click here.

Buoyancy Aid – On initial shock contact with cold water your body movements are uncoordinated. Wearing a buoyancy aid will enable you to float while your body adjusts to the water temperature. Ensure that you are not wearing heavy clothing when wet  ( i.e. woolly jumpers) that overcomes buoyancy. Furthermore, check that your buoyancy aid meets safety standards, and has not become degraded through use (foam depressed).

Full wetsuit or dry suit covering arms and legs. Modern thick wetsuits are made of material that allows warmth when wet and flexibility of movement. They are value for money dependent on the different brands. Dry suits are more expensive, but provide benefits in keeping clothing worn underneath dry and easy to wear. However, dry-suits do not provide warmth within themselves and warm clothing is required. Ensure that the bought dry-suit does not leak, as this will create negative buoyancy and reduces warmth. 

Wet-suit boots – These will provide warmth to your feet when wet. Wearing sailing socks (or ordinary) will provide an extra layer of warmth. Sailing in ordinary shoes or trainers in cold weather will result in painful cramp.

Gloves – Buy sailing gloves from the chandlers (click here). These will protect your hands from rope burns and provide warmth. Sailing without gloves will result in frozen hands that will not be able to grip rope, or be used.

Waterproofs – They are required to keep the wind chill (heat removal) from your wet clothing. This should include leggings with brazes and a spray top. The layering of clothing is more important than quality (or brand names). Layering  T-shirts, thin fleeces and multi-layered waterproofs provide trapped air and warmth  (a bin liner waist coat is invaluable in an emergency).

Hat – Up to 1/3rd of the body’s heat loss can take place from the head (reference Mountaincraft and Leadership, Eric Langmuir). A close fitting peeked cap will avoid its loss overboard, as well as eye protection from the sun and rain. In more extreme conditions a balaclava (rolled down hat) protects ears and neck.   

Summer Clothing

Buoyancy Aid –  On initial shock contact with cold water your body movements are uncoordinated. Wearing a buoyancy aid will enable you to float while your body adjusts to the water temperature. Ensure that you are not wearing heavy clothing when wet  ( i.e. woolly jumpers) that overcomes buoyancy. Furthermore, check that your buoyancy aid meets safety standards, and has not become degraded through use (foam depressed). Buoyancy aids can be loaned from the club.

Waterproofs – They are required to keep the wind chill (heat removal) from your wet clothing. This should include leggings with brazes and a spray top. The layering of clothing is more important than quality (or brand names). Layering  T-shirts, thin fleeces and multi-layered waterproofs provide trapped air and warmth  (a bin liner waist coat is invaluable in an emergency). Long sleaved clothing will also protect from pre-longed sun exposure.

Gloves – Protect your hands from rope burns.

Hat – A peeked hat will protect your eyes from wind and rain. During those long  summer sea regattas, it will protect your head from sunstroke/heatstoke due to the sun’s strong radiation (UV).  

Sunglasses – Prelonged sun reflectance from the water surface  causes headaches without protection.

Wet-suit clothing – There are all sorts of wet suit clothing including long-johns and wet suit shorts, but simply t-shirt and shorts can be worn in the best summer weather.

Sun tan lotion – Slap on the high factor stuff if you like being outdoors all day.

A final note. Wear the correct clothing and you will feel compfortable all day long, enjoying the sport of sailing. You should not feel cold, shivering, or be fighting against the elements. Adjust your clothing through experience to fit your needs.